FILE - In this Aug. 16, 1960, file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Col. Joe Kittinger steps off a balloon-supported gondola at an altitude of 102,800 feet. In freefall for 4.5 minutes at speeds up to 614 mph and temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit, he opened his parachute at 18,000 feet. On Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, if winds allow, in the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., pilot Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Aug. 16, 1960, file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Col. Joe Kittinger steps off a balloon-supported gondola at an altitude of 102,800 feet. In freefall for 4.5 minutes at speeds up to 614 mph and temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit, he opened his parachute at 18,000 feet. On Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, if winds allow, in the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., pilot Felix Baumgartner  will attempt to break Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 16, 1960, file photo provided by the U.S. Air Force, Col. Joe Kittinger steps off a balloon-supported gondola at an altitude of 102,800 feet. In freefall for 4.5 minutes at speeds up to 614 mph and temperatures as low as -94 degrees Fahrenheit, he opened his parachute at 18,000 feet. On Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2012, if winds allow, in the desert surrounding Roswell, N.M., pilot Felix Baumgartner will attempt to break Kittinger's world record for the highest and fastest free fall. (AP Photo/U.S. Air Force, File)
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