FILE - In this Aug. 18, 1988 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, Vice President George H.W. Bush, right, and his running mate Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., wave to the assembly of the Republican National Convention in New Orleans after their acceptance speeches for the presidential and vice-presidential nomination. Long gone are the passionate debates. Long gone is the suspense about who will emerge as the party's presidential nominee. Political conventions now are carefully scripted pep rallies aimed at a national TV audience. Not since the 1970s, in fact, has the nation had a major-party national convention begin with the nominee in doubt. Americans already know how the story will end at this year's Republican and Democratic national gatherings. So have modern-day conventions become irrelevant? (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Aug. 18, 1988 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, Vice President George H.W. Bush,  right, and his running mate Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., wave to the assembly of the Republican National Convention in New Orleans after their acceptance speeches for the presidential and vice-presidential nomination.  Long gone are the passionate debates. Long gone is the suspense about who will emerge as the party's presidential nominee. Political conventions now are carefully scripted pep rallies aimed at a national TV audience. Not since the 1970s, in fact, has the nation had a major-party national convention begin with the nominee in doubt. Americans already know how the story will end at this year's Republican and Democratic national gatherings. So have modern-day conventions become irrelevant?  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 18, 1988 file photo, Republican presidential candidate, Vice President George H.W. Bush, right, and his running mate Sen. Dan Quayle, R-Ind., wave to the assembly of the Republican National Convention in New Orleans after their acceptance speeches for the presidential and vice-presidential nomination. Long gone are the passionate debates. Long gone is the suspense about who will emerge as the party's presidential nominee. Political conventions now are carefully scripted pep rallies aimed at a national TV audience. Not since the 1970s, in fact, has the nation had a major-party national convention begin with the nominee in doubt. Americans already know how the story will end at this year's Republican and Democratic national gatherings. So have modern-day conventions become irrelevant? (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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