FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2010 file photo, Iuliia Bolgaryna, right, and her roommates Olga Nevdakha, left, and Tetiana Pasichnyk, center, sit together during an interview in Surf City, N.C. Bolgaryna ... more 
FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2010 file photo, Iuliia Bolgaryna, right, and her roommates Olga Nevdakha, left, and Tetiana Pasichnyk, center, sit together during an interview in Surf City, N.C. Bolgaryna came to work in summer 2010 at a souvenir store in North Carolina. The store manager offered to let her and two other women from the Ukraine stay with him for $120 a week. But he wouldn't let them eat at the table, so they huddled together for meals on the floor. They worked loads of overtime but were only paid for 40 hours a week. The store manager declined to comment. "It was almost normal that he screamed, that we worked 14 hours, that we ate on the floor," she said. "That was our America." The State Department is acknowledging that one of its most popular exchange programs leaves foreign college students vulnerable to exploitation. It's unclear if new regulations the agency is pushing will stop the abuses. The revised rules which take effect July 15, 2011 will shift more responsibility onto companies designated sponsors in the J-1 Summer Work Travel Program. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome) less 
1 / 1
Associated Press | Photo By Gerry Broome
Mon, Jun 20, 2011 7:26 AM EDT