FILE - In this Aug. 26, 2009 file photo, a merchant speaks with a woman holding her ill child at a pharmacy in Pailin, Cambodia. The future of a pricey malaria program meant to provide cheap drugs for poor patients may be in jeopardy after health officials clashed over its effectiveness in two new reports. In 2010, the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria was started by groups including United Nations agencies and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. It was a pilot project to subsidize artemesinin combination drugs. Most of the drugs bought were sold in the private sector, where there are few controls on who gets them. But in October 2012, a report by Oxfam, an international charity, labeled the program a failure and said there was no proof it had saved lives because officials didn't track who received the drugs. (AP Photo/David Longstreath, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Aug. 26, 2009 file photo, a merchant speaks with a woman holding her ill child at a pharmacy in Pailin, Cambodia. The future of a pricey malaria program meant to provide cheap drugs for poor patients may be in jeopardy after health officials clashed over its effectiveness in two new reports. In 2010, the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria was started by groups including United Nations agencies and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. It was a pilot project to subsidize artemesinin combination drugs. Most of the drugs bought were sold in the private sector, where there are few controls on who gets them. But in October 2012, a report by Oxfam, an international charity, labeled the program a failure and said there was no proof it had saved lives because officials didn't track who received the drugs. (AP Photo/David Longstreath, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 26, 2009 file photo, a merchant speaks with a woman holding her ill child at a pharmacy in Pailin, Cambodia. The future of a pricey malaria program meant to provide cheap drugs for poor patients may be in jeopardy after health officials clashed over its effectiveness in two new reports. In 2010, the Affordable Medicines Facility for malaria was started by groups including United Nations agencies and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. It was a pilot project to subsidize artemesinin combination drugs. Most of the drugs bought were sold in the private sector, where there are few controls on who gets them. But in October 2012, a report by Oxfam, an international charity, labeled the program a failure and said there was no proof it had saved lives because officials didn't track who received the drugs. (AP Photo/David Longstreath, File)
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