FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2010 file photo, an Oxford English Dictionary is shown at the headquarters of The Associated Press in New York. A report that Oxford University had changed its comma rule left some punctuation obsessives alarmed, annoyed, and distraught. Passions subsided as the university said the news was imprecise, incomplete and misleading. Oxford University Press, birthplace of the Oxford comma, said Thursday, June 30, 2011, that there has been no change in its century-old style, and jumped into the Twittersphere to confirm that it still follows the standard set out in "New Hart's Rules." (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2010 file photo, an Oxford English Dictionary is shown at the headquarters of The Associated Press in New York. A report that Oxford University had changed its comma rule left some punctuation obsessives alarmed, annoyed, and distraught. Passions subsided as the university said the news was imprecise, incomplete and misleading. Oxford University Press, birthplace of the Oxford comma, said Thursday, June 30, 2011, that there has been no change in its century-old style, and jumped into the Twittersphere to confirm that it still follows the standard set out in "New Hart's Rules."  (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2010 file photo, an Oxford English Dictionary is shown at the headquarters of The Associated Press in New York. A report that Oxford University had changed its comma rule left some punctuation obsessives alarmed, annoyed, and distraught. Passions subsided as the university said the news was imprecise, incomplete and misleading. Oxford University Press, birthplace of the Oxford comma, said Thursday, June 30, 2011, that there has been no change in its century-old style, and jumped into the Twittersphere to confirm that it still follows the standard set out in "New Hart's Rules." (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
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