FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2010 file photo, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., walks near the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington. Nearly a year after the Obama administration announced an overhaul of ethics rules to deter the cozy relationship between offshore oil and gas companies and the agency that regulates them, documents obtained by The Associated Press show that ties between the industry and its regulator persist. “Our sense is the revolving door is still swinging too widely,” said Wyden, in an interview with AP, after reviewing the recusals. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2010 file photo, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., walks near the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington. Nearly a year after the Obama administration announced an overhaul of ethics rules to deter the cozy relationship between offshore oil and gas companies and the agency that regulates them, documents obtained by The Associated Press show that ties between the industry and its regulator persist. “Our sense is the revolving door is still swinging too widely,” said Wyden, in an interview with AP, after reviewing the recusals. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2010 file photo, Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., walks near the floor of the Senate on Capitol Hill in Washington. Nearly a year after the Obama administration announced an overhaul of ethics rules to deter the cozy relationship between offshore oil and gas companies and the agency that regulates them, documents obtained by The Associated Press show that ties between the industry and its regulator persist. “Our sense is the revolving door is still swinging too widely,” said Wyden, in an interview with AP, after reviewing the recusals. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
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