FILE - In this Dec. 2005 file photo provided by the National Park Service shows National Park Service fisheries biologist Jeff Miller examining the coral reef in the Buck Island Reef National Monument... more 
FILE - In this Dec. 2005 file photo provided by the National Park Service shows National Park Service fisheries biologist Jeff Miller examining the coral reef in the Buck Island Reef National Monument in St. Croix, Virgin Islands, after bleaching from record hot water followed by disease has killed ancient and delicate Caribbean coral.According to coral experts like Roberto Iglesias the so-far elusive goal of world climate talks at the UN Climate Change Conference in Cancun, Mexico, limiting global warming to 2 degrees C (3.6 F), is too little too late. Coral reefs, which are like underwater jungles that host 25 percent of marine species, have been weakened by water pollution and overfishing, leaving them vulnerable to a warming ocean that "bleaches" and kills corals. less 
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Associated Press | Photo By U.S. Geological Survey, Caroline Rogers, File
Tue, Dec 7, 2010 4:10 PM EST