FILE - This file handout photo provided by the Tennessee Valley Authority shows the massive ash spill at the Kingston Fossil Plant in Kingston, Tenn., on Dec. 23, 2008, the day following the spill. The spill is considered one of the nation's worst environmental disasters and the incident drew national attention to coal ash and its ominous-sounding ingredients. But two years after the agency proposed regulating coal ash as hazardous and placing restrictions on its disposal, the the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued no ruling. (AP Photo/TVA, File)

Associated Press
FILE - This file handout photo provided by the Tennessee Valley Authority shows the massive ash spill at the Kingston Fossil Plant in Kingston, Tenn., on Dec. 23, 2008, the day following the spill. The spill is considered one of the nation's worst environmental disasters and the incident drew national attention to coal ash and its ominous-sounding ingredients. But two years after the agency proposed regulating coal ash as hazardous and placing restrictions on its disposal, the the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued no ruling.   (AP Photo/TVA, File)
FILE - This file handout photo provided by the Tennessee Valley Authority shows the massive ash spill at the Kingston Fossil Plant in Kingston, Tenn., on Dec. 23, 2008, the day following the spill. The spill is considered one of the nation's worst environmental disasters and the incident drew national attention to coal ash and its ominous-sounding ingredients. But two years after the agency proposed regulating coal ash as hazardous and placing restrictions on its disposal, the the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has issued no ruling. (AP Photo/TVA, File)
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