FILE - In this Friday, May 10, 2002 file photo Alexander Litvinenko, former KGB spy and author of the book "Blowing Up Russia: Terror From Within", is photographed at his home in London. Russia’s transition from a Kremlin-controlled economy to a free market in the 1990s brought on a wave of contract killings as criminals, entrepreneurs, and corrupt officials tried muscle each other out of lucrative businesses. The recent death of 67-year old Boris Berezovsky, which remains unexplained, has revived fears that the assassins that have long stalked oligarchs and opposition figures back in Russia have been making their home in the U.K. Litvinenko, a former KGB agent turned fierce critic of the Kremlin, died after ingesting polonium secreted inside his tea at a London hotel in 2006.(AP Photo/Alistair Fuller, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Friday, May 10, 2002 file photo Alexander Litvinenko, former KGB spy and author of the book "Blowing Up Russia: Terror From Within", is photographed at his home in London. Russia’s transition from a Kremlin-controlled economy to a free market in the 1990s brought on a wave of contract killings as criminals, entrepreneurs, and corrupt officials tried muscle each other out of lucrative businesses.  The recent death of 67-year old Boris Berezovsky, which remains unexplained, has revived fears that the assassins that have long stalked oligarchs and opposition figures back in Russia have been making their home in the U.K.  Litvinenko, a former KGB agent turned fierce critic of the Kremlin, died after ingesting polonium secreted inside his tea at a London hotel in 2006.(AP Photo/Alistair Fuller, File)
FILE - In this Friday, May 10, 2002 file photo Alexander Litvinenko, former KGB spy and author of the book "Blowing Up Russia: Terror From Within", is photographed at his home in London. Russia’s transition from a Kremlin-controlled economy to a free market in the 1990s brought on a wave of contract killings as criminals, entrepreneurs, and corrupt officials tried muscle each other out of lucrative businesses. The recent death of 67-year old Boris Berezovsky, which remains unexplained, has revived fears that the assassins that have long stalked oligarchs and opposition figures back in Russia have been making their home in the U.K. Litvinenko, a former KGB agent turned fierce critic of the Kremlin, died after ingesting polonium secreted inside his tea at a London hotel in 2006.(AP Photo/Alistair Fuller, File)
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