FILE - In this Friday, May 26, 2006 file photo, a member of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery salutes the coffin of Capt. Nichola Goddard carried on a gun carriage following her funeral service in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Goddard, Canada’s first female combat soldier killed in battle, died by enemy fire in Afghanistan on May 17, 2006. For a nation already divided about participating in the American-led Afghanistan war, Goddard's death was a particular shock, and two more Canadian women have since died in combat. But Canada remains in the small group of countries - including Israel, France, Norway, Australia, New Zealand and now the U.S. - that have opened their fighting ranks to female soldiers. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Friday, May 26, 2006 file photo, a member of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery salutes the coffin of Capt. Nichola Goddard carried on a gun carriage following her funeral service in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Goddard, Canada’s first female combat soldier killed in battle, died by enemy fire in Afghanistan on May 17, 2006. For a nation already divided about participating in the American-led Afghanistan war, Goddard's death was a particular shock, and two more Canadian women have since died in combat. But Canada remains in the small group of countries - including Israel, France, Norway, Australia, New Zealand and now the U.S. - that have opened their fighting ranks to female soldiers. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)
FILE - In this Friday, May 26, 2006 file photo, a member of the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery salutes the coffin of Capt. Nichola Goddard carried on a gun carriage following her funeral service in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Goddard, Canada’s first female combat soldier killed in battle, died by enemy fire in Afghanistan on May 17, 2006. For a nation already divided about participating in the American-led Afghanistan war, Goddard's death was a particular shock, and two more Canadian women have since died in combat. But Canada remains in the small group of countries - including Israel, France, Norway, Australia, New Zealand and now the U.S. - that have opened their fighting ranks to female soldiers. (AP Photo/The Canadian Press, Jeff McIntosh)
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