FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2011 file photo, a woman passes a poster reading: 'Weapons Monopoly for Criminals? No' in Zurich, Switzerland. In September 2001, a man named Friedrich Leibacher went on a rampage in the regional parliament in the wealthy northern Swiss city of Zug, killing 14 people and himself, apparently over a grudge against a local official. The massacre, along with a campaign to reduce Switzerland's high level of gun suicide, led to a referendum last year. It proposed that military-issued firearms must be locked in secure army depots and would have banned the sale of fully automatic weapons and pump-action rifles. (AP Photo/Keystone/Walter Bieri, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2011 file photo, a woman passes a poster reading: 'Weapons Monopoly for Criminals? No' in Zurich, Switzerland. In September 2001, a man named Friedrich Leibacher went on a rampage in the regional parliament in the wealthy northern Swiss city of Zug, killing 14 people and himself, apparently over a grudge against a local official. The massacre, along with a campaign to reduce Switzerland's high level of gun suicide, led to a referendum last year. It proposed that military-issued firearms must be locked in secure army depots and would have banned the sale of fully automatic weapons and pump-action rifles. (AP Photo/Keystone/Walter Bieri, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2011 file photo, a woman passes a poster reading: 'Weapons Monopoly for Criminals? No' in Zurich, Switzerland. In September 2001, a man named Friedrich Leibacher went on a rampage in the regional parliament in the wealthy northern Swiss city of Zug, killing 14 people and himself, apparently over a grudge against a local official. The massacre, along with a campaign to reduce Switzerland's high level of gun suicide, led to a referendum last year. It proposed that military-issued firearms must be locked in secure army depots and would have banned the sale of fully automatic weapons and pump-action rifles. (AP Photo/Keystone/Walter Bieri, File)