FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2013, file photo, equipment to analyze mobile and smart phones is displayed in a lab during a media tour of the Cybercrime Center at Europol headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2013, file photo, equipment to analyze mobile and smart phones is displayed in a lab during a media tour of the Cybercrime Center at Europol headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse.  (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 11, 2013, file photo, equipment to analyze mobile and smart phones is displayed in a lab during a media tour of the Cybercrime Center at Europol headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands. If a purse with $900 is stolen, the victim probably would call the police. If a computer hacker steals $900 from that same person's bank account, what then? Call the police? Could they even help? As it is now, local police don't have widespread know-how to investigate cybercrimes. They rely heavily on the expertise of the federal government, which focuses on large, often international cybercrimes. What's missing is the first response role, typically the preserve of local police departments that respond to calls for help from individuals and communities. They're looking to boost their expertise to be able to respond to high-tech crimes that are expected to only get worse. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)
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