FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2008 file photo, kidnapped in 2002 by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, freed hostage Clara Rojas prepares to speak upon her arrival in Bogota, Colombia. Rojas, who gave birth to a son in 2004 while a hostage of the rebel group, has asked a court to prevent the film, “Operation E,” from being shown in the country, saying it would harm her child and “the free development of his personality.” Rojas objects to the movie’s focus on the farmer, Jose Crisanto Gomez, who she says held her son “captive” for seven months before turning him over the Colombia's child welfare agency. (AP Photo/William Fernando Martinez, File)

Associated Press
FILE -  In this Jan. 13, 2008 file photo, kidnapped in 2002 by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, freed hostage Clara Rojas prepares to speak upon her arrival in Bogota, Colombia. Rojas, who gave birth to a son in 2004 while a hostage of the rebel group, has asked a court to prevent the film, “Operation E,” from being shown in the country, saying it would harm her child and “the free development of his personality.”  Rojas objects to the movie’s focus on the farmer, Jose Crisanto Gomez, who she says held her son “captive” for seven months before turning him over the Colombia's child welfare agency. (AP Photo/William Fernando Martinez, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 13, 2008 file photo, kidnapped in 2002 by the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, freed hostage Clara Rojas prepares to speak upon her arrival in Bogota, Colombia. Rojas, who gave birth to a son in 2004 while a hostage of the rebel group, has asked a court to prevent the film, “Operation E,” from being shown in the country, saying it would harm her child and “the free development of his personality.” Rojas objects to the movie’s focus on the farmer, Jose Crisanto Gomez, who she says held her son “captive” for seven months before turning him over the Colombia's child welfare agency. (AP Photo/William Fernando Martinez, File)
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