FILE - In this Jan. 14, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy speaks in the House Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington during his State of the Union report to a joint session of Congress with Vice President Lyndon Johnson sitting behind him. Kennedy's civil rights legacy has undergone substantial reassessment since his Nov. 22, 1963, assassination. His successor, President Johnson, receives credit for hammering through the monumental Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, which ensured full citizenship for African-Americans. (AP Photo/File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Jan. 14, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy speaks in the House Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington during his State of the Union report to a joint session of Congress with Vice President Lyndon Johnson sitting behind him. Kennedy's civil rights legacy has undergone substantial reassessment since his Nov. 22, 1963, assassination. His successor, President Johnson, receives credit for hammering through the monumental Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, which ensured full citizenship for African-Americans. (AP Photo/File)
FILE - In this Jan. 14, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy speaks in the House Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington during his State of the Union report to a joint session of Congress with Vice President Lyndon Johnson sitting behind him. Kennedy's civil rights legacy has undergone substantial reassessment since his Nov. 22, 1963, assassination. His successor, President Johnson, receives credit for hammering through the monumental Civil Rights Act and Voting Rights Act, which ensured full citizenship for African-Americans. (AP Photo/File)
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