FILE- A Jan. 1999 file photo shows Edmund Burke, of Walpole, Mass., a former suspect in the killing of 75-year-old Irene Kennedy, at his attorney's office in Boston, Mass. was arrested in 1998 in the murder of 75-year-old Walpole, Mass., woman and spent 41 days in prison. The woman's actual killer was identified after DNA taken from the bite mark was matched to a profile in a national database. Bite-mark analysis, though common in trials involving rape, murder and child abuse, and often cited as key evidence leading to arrests, convictions and imprisonment, is a field under fire. Since 2000, at least 18 men convicted in rapes and murders largely because of bite-mark analysis have been exonerated by DNA testing or otherwise proved not guilty. (AP Photo/Gail Oskin, File)

Associated Press
FILE- A Jan. 1999 file photo shows Edmund Burke, of Walpole, Mass., a former suspect in the killing of 75-year-old Irene Kennedy, at his attorney's office in Boston, Mass. was arrested in 1998 in the murder of 75-year-old Walpole, Mass., woman and spent 41 days in prison. The woman's actual killer was identified after DNA taken from the bite mark was matched to a profile in a national database. Bite-mark analysis, though common in trials involving rape, murder and child abuse, and often cited as key evidence leading to arrests, convictions and imprisonment, is a field under fire. Since 2000, at least 18 men convicted in rapes and murders largely because of bite-mark analysis have been exonerated by DNA testing or otherwise proved not guilty. (AP Photo/Gail Oskin, File)
FILE- A Jan. 1999 file photo shows Edmund Burke, of Walpole, Mass., a former suspect in the killing of 75-year-old Irene Kennedy, at his attorney's office in Boston, Mass. was arrested in 1998 in the murder of 75-year-old Walpole, Mass., woman and spent 41 days in prison. The woman's actual killer was identified after DNA taken from the bite mark was matched to a profile in a national database. Bite-mark analysis, though common in trials involving rape, murder and child abuse, and often cited as key evidence leading to arrests, convictions and imprisonment, is a field under fire. Since 2000, at least 18 men convicted in rapes and murders largely because of bite-mark analysis have been exonerated by DNA testing or otherwise proved not guilty. (AP Photo/Gail Oskin, File)
View Comments (0)