FILE - In a Jan. 4, 1998 file photo, General Motors unveils the EV1 Parallel Hybrid vehicle at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. It’s been nearly a quarter of a century since the last big jump in battery technology. As 21st century technology strains to be ever faster, cleaner and cheaper, the battery, an invention from more than 200 years ago keeps holding it back. It's why electric cars aren't clogging the roads and why Boeing's new ultra-efficient 787 Dreamliners aren't flying high. (AP Photo/Osamu Honda, File) JAPAN OUT

Associated Press
FILE - In a Jan. 4, 1998 file photo, General Motors unveils the EV1 Parallel Hybrid vehicle at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. It’s been nearly a quarter of a century since the last big jump in battery technology.  As 21st century technology strains to be ever faster, cleaner and cheaper, the battery, an invention from more than 200 years ago keeps holding it back. It's why electric cars aren't clogging the roads and why Boeing's new ultra-efficient 787 Dreamliners aren't flying high. (AP Photo/Osamu Honda, File) JAPAN OUT
FILE - In a Jan. 4, 1998 file photo, General Motors unveils the EV1 Parallel Hybrid vehicle at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. It’s been nearly a quarter of a century since the last big jump in battery technology. As 21st century technology strains to be ever faster, cleaner and cheaper, the battery, an invention from more than 200 years ago keeps holding it back. It's why electric cars aren't clogging the roads and why Boeing's new ultra-efficient 787 Dreamliners aren't flying high. (AP Photo/Osamu Honda, File) JAPAN OUT
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