FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2007 photo, Spain's Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero tours the scene of utter destruction from the car bombing at the Terminal Four building in Madrid. Spaniards ... more 
FILE - In this Jan. 4, 2007 photo, Spain's Prime Minister Jose Luis Rodriguez Zapatero tours the scene of utter destruction from the car bombing at the Terminal Four building in Madrid. Spaniards weary of decades of killings at the hands of the Basque separatist group ETA are pondering whether the beginning of the end of their nightmare might be near. ETA has not killed anyone in Spain in over a year and it declared a ceasefire in September, and while nearly a dozen such truces have come and gone over the years, raising hopes only to see them erased with more bloodshed and tears, this time something bigger and potentially historic might be afoot.ETA's disappearance would rid Europe of its last major armed political militancy.ETA's banned political wing Batasuna, now backed by some mainstream parties, is increasingly vocal in its new position that blowing up police cars and shooting politicians at point-blank range is not the way to work toward some Basques cherished goal of a country of their own and has called on ETA to declare a permanent ceasefire. less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Daniel Ochoa de Olza, File
Sun, Oct 31, 2010 6:06 AM EDT