FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2008 file photo, International Cricket Council President Malcolm Speed holds a press conference at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Melbourne, Australia. Australia's ... more 
FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2008 file photo, International Cricket Council President Malcolm Speed holds a press conference at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Melbourne, Australia. Australia's highest-profile sports are backing a government push to make sports corruption a crime with penalties of up to 10 years in prison. The push for tougher penalties for corruption has intensified in the wake of bribery scandals that overshadowed the recent FIFA congress, an investigation into spot fixing in a National Rugby League match and the recent bans for three Pakistani cricketers accused of accepting money for conspiring to ensure no-balls were delivered at specific times during a match against England. "The record in Australia has been outstanding, we've had very few instances of betting related corruption, compared with parts of Europe and Asia. But the sports realize it's a high-risk area, and that's why they're working to do something about it," Speed, the former International Cricket Council chief executive who is now executive director of the Coalition of Major Professional and Participation Sports, told The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Andrew Brownbill, File) less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Andrew Brownbill, File
Wed, Jun 8, 2011 1:34 AM EDT