FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2008 file photo, Shinya Yamanaka, a Kyoto University scientist who invented a new, easy-to-handle technology to create the equivalent of human stem cells from ordinary tissue like skin, speaks at a press conference in Tokyo. Yamanaka and British researcher John Gurdon have won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology. The prize committee at Stockholm's Karolinska Institute said Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 that the two researchers won the award "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent." (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2008 file photo, Shinya Yamanaka, a Kyoto University scientist who invented a new, easy-to-handle technology to create the equivalent of  human stem cells from ordinary tissue like skin, speaks at a press conference in Tokyo. Yamanaka and British researcher John Gurdon have won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology. The prize committee at Stockholm's Karolinska Institute said Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 that the two researchers won the award "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent." (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2008 file photo, Shinya Yamanaka, a Kyoto University scientist who invented a new, easy-to-handle technology to create the equivalent of human stem cells from ordinary tissue like skin, speaks at a press conference in Tokyo. Yamanaka and British researcher John Gurdon have won this year's Nobel Prize in medicine or physiology. The prize committee at Stockholm's Karolinska Institute said Monday, Oct. 8, 2012 that the two researchers won the award "for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent." (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)
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