FILE - Joe Reneau, right, gets a hug from friend Cody Parsons in his family room in Sparks, Okla. on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 after the room was damaged when the chimney collapsed during an earthquake and fell partially through the roof, at upper right. Neither Joe nor his wife were in the room at the time, and were not injured. A team of scientists have determined that a 5.6 magnitude quake in Oklahoma in 2011 was caused when oil drilling waste was injected deep underground. The report was released Tuesday, March 26, 2013 by the journal Geology. That makes it the most powerful quake to be blamed on deep injections of wastewater, although not everyone agrees. Oklahoma’s state seismologists say the quake was natural. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Associated Press
FILE - Joe Reneau, right, gets a hug from friend Cody Parsons in his family room in Sparks, Okla. on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 after the room was damaged when the chimney collapsed during an earthquake and fell partially through the roof, at upper right. Neither Joe nor his wife were in the room at the time, and were not injured. A team of scientists have determined that a 5.6 magnitude quake in Oklahoma in 2011 was caused when oil drilling waste was injected deep underground. The report was released Tuesday, March 26, 2013 by the journal Geology. That makes it the most powerful quake to be blamed on deep injections of wastewater, although not everyone agrees. Oklahoma’s state seismologists say the quake was natural. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
FILE - Joe Reneau, right, gets a hug from friend Cody Parsons in his family room in Sparks, Okla. on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2011 after the room was damaged when the chimney collapsed during an earthquake and fell partially through the roof, at upper right. Neither Joe nor his wife were in the room at the time, and were not injured. A team of scientists have determined that a 5.6 magnitude quake in Oklahoma in 2011 was caused when oil drilling waste was injected deep underground. The report was released Tuesday, March 26, 2013 by the journal Geology. That makes it the most powerful quake to be blamed on deep injections of wastewater, although not everyone agrees. Oklahoma’s state seismologists say the quake was natural. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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