FILE- In this June 16, 2003 file photo, a double-decker bus similar to the type of bus being considered in Savannah, Ga., passes historic Independence Hall in Philadelphia. A proposal to roll out double-decker buses on the streets of historic downtown Savannah has residents complaining the change would amount to a tourism overload. Two Boston businessmen are lobbying Savannah City Hall to end a 17-year ban on double-decker buses in the downtown historic district of Georgia's oldest city. The city's Downtown Neighborhood Association is opposing the change. Its members say the buses would risk collisions with low-hanging tree limbs and would turn passengers into Peeping Toms capable of peering into second-story windows. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma, File)

Associated Press
FILE- In this June 16, 2003 file photo, a double-decker bus similar to the type of bus being considered in Savannah, Ga., passes historic Independence Hall in Philadelphia. A proposal to roll out double-decker buses on the streets of historic downtown Savannah has residents complaining the change would amount to a tourism overload. Two Boston businessmen are lobbying Savannah City Hall to end a 17-year ban on double-decker buses in the downtown historic district of Georgia's oldest city. The city's Downtown Neighborhood Association is opposing the change. Its members say the buses would risk collisions with low-hanging tree limbs and would turn passengers into Peeping Toms capable of peering into second-story windows. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma, File)
FILE- In this June 16, 2003 file photo, a double-decker bus similar to the type of bus being considered in Savannah, Ga., passes historic Independence Hall in Philadelphia. A proposal to roll out double-decker buses on the streets of historic downtown Savannah has residents complaining the change would amount to a tourism overload. Two Boston businessmen are lobbying Savannah City Hall to end a 17-year ban on double-decker buses in the downtown historic district of Georgia's oldest city. The city's Downtown Neighborhood Association is opposing the change. Its members say the buses would risk collisions with low-hanging tree limbs and would turn passengers into Peeping Toms capable of peering into second-story windows. (AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma, File)
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