FILE - In this June 2007 file photograph taken by the 

FILE -  In this June 2007 file photograph taken by the United States Army Corps of Engineers and released by the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, the Khan Bani Saad Correctional Facility, about 20 kilometers (12 miles) northeast of Baghdad, is seen from the air. Ten years and $60 billion in taxpayer funds later, Iraq is still so unstable and broken that even its leaders question whether U.S. efforts to rebuild it were worth the cost. n Iraq’s eastern Diyala province, a crossroads for Shiite militias, Sunni insurgents and Kurdish squatters, the U.S. began building a 3,600-bed prison in 2004 but abandoned the project after three years to flee a surge in violence. The half-completed Khan Bani Sa’ad Correctional Facility cost American taxpayers $40 million but sits in rubble, and Iraqi Justice Ministry officials say they have no plans to ever finish or use it. (AP Photo/Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, File)
Associated Press
FILE - In this June 2007 file photograph taken by the United States Army Corps of Engineers and released by the Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, the Khan Bani Saad Correctional Facility, about 20 kilometers (12 miles) northeast of Baghdad, is seen from the air. Ten years and $60 billion in taxpayer funds later, Iraq is still so unstable and broken that even its leaders question whether U.S. efforts to rebuild it were worth the cost. n Iraq’s eastern Diyala province, a crossroads for Shiite militias, Sunni insurgents and Kurdish squatters, the U.S. began building a 3,600-bed prison in 2004 but abandoned the project after three years to flee a surge in violence. The half-completed Khan Bani Sa’ad Correctional Facility cost American taxpayers $40 million but sits in rubble, and Iraqi Justice Ministry officials say they have no plans to ever finish or use it. (AP Photo/Special Inspector General for Iraq Reconstruction, File)
View Comments