FILE - In this March 1, 2012, file photo Lindsay Matush who traveled from Joplin, Mo., to New Orleans to work with a group that renovates Katrina-damaged homes, listens during a dedication ceremony for a newly renovated home in New Orleans. The two cities devastated by recent natural disasters _ Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and a killer Midwestern tornado 10 months ago _ are forging an unlikely partnership that could change the way other American cities both plan for and recover from the next blow by nature’s fury. (AP Photo/Cheryl Gerber, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this March 1, 2012, file photo Lindsay Matush who traveled from Joplin, Mo., to New Orleans to work with a group that renovates Katrina-damaged homes, listens during a dedication ceremony for a newly renovated home in New Orleans. The two cities devastated by recent natural disasters _ Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and a killer Midwestern tornado 10 months ago _ are forging an unlikely partnership that could change the way other American cities both plan for and recover from the next blow by nature’s fury. (AP Photo/Cheryl Gerber, File)
FILE - In this March 1, 2012, file photo Lindsay Matush who traveled from Joplin, Mo., to New Orleans to work with a group that renovates Katrina-damaged homes, listens during a dedication ceremony for a newly renovated home in New Orleans. The two cities devastated by recent natural disasters _ Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and a killer Midwestern tornado 10 months ago _ are forging an unlikely partnership that could change the way other American cities both plan for and recover from the next blow by nature’s fury. (AP Photo/Cheryl Gerber, File)
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