FILE - In this March 21, 1996, file photo, Christine Ferguson, left, talks to reporters as then-Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney watches at the Statehouse in Boston. It sounds like a silver lining. Even if the Supreme Court overturns President Barack Obama's health care law, employers can keep offering popular coverage for the young adult children of their workers. But here's the catch: The parents' taxes would go up. That's only one of the messy potential ripple effects when the Supreme Court delivers its verdict on the Affordable Care Act in June 2012. The law affects most major components of the U.S. health care system in its effort to extend coverage to millions of uninsured people. The nation is so divided that states led by Republicans are largely unprepared to carry out critical requirements such as creating insurance markets. "At the end of the day, I don't think any of the major players in the health insurance industry or the provider community really wants to see the whole thing overturned," said Ferguson, a health policy expert who was commissioner of public health in Massachusetts when Romney was governor. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this March 21, 1996, file photo, Christine Ferguson, left, talks to reporters as then-Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney watches at the Statehouse in Boston. It sounds like a silver lining. Even if the Supreme Court overturns President Barack Obama's health care law, employers can keep offering popular coverage for the young adult children of their workers. But here's the catch: The parents' taxes would go up. That's only one of the messy potential ripple effects when the Supreme Court delivers its verdict on the Affordable Care Act in June 2012. The law affects most major components of the U.S. health care system in its effort to extend coverage to millions of uninsured people. The nation is so divided that states led by Republicans are largely unprepared to carry out critical requirements such as creating insurance markets. "At the end of the day, I don't think any of the major players in the health insurance industry or the provider community really wants to see the whole thing overturned," said Ferguson, a health policy expert who was commissioner of public health in Massachusetts when Romney was governor. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
FILE - In this March 21, 1996, file photo, Christine Ferguson, left, talks to reporters as then-Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney watches at the Statehouse in Boston. It sounds like a silver lining. Even if the Supreme Court overturns President Barack Obama's health care law, employers can keep offering popular coverage for the young adult children of their workers. But here's the catch: The parents' taxes would go up. That's only one of the messy potential ripple effects when the Supreme Court delivers its verdict on the Affordable Care Act in June 2012. The law affects most major components of the U.S. health care system in its effort to extend coverage to millions of uninsured people. The nation is so divided that states led by Republicans are largely unprepared to carry out critical requirements such as creating insurance markets. "At the end of the day, I don't think any of the major players in the health insurance industry or the provider community really wants to see the whole thing overturned," said Ferguson, a health policy expert who was commissioner of public health in Massachusetts when Romney was governor. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
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