FILE - In this March 31, 2011, file photo Homeland Security Chief Privacy Officer Mary Ellen Callahan, left, and General Counsel Ivan Fong are sworn in on Capitol Hill prior to testifying about the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)at a House committee hearing. Acting on his promise to reinvigorate FOIA on his first day in office, Obama told all federal agencies to adopt a "presumption in favor of disclosure". According to an Associated Press analysis of federal data over the last three years from 37 of the largest federal departments and agencies, the Obama administration couldn't keep pace with the increasing number of people asking for copies of government documents, emails, photographs and more under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this March 31, 2011, file photo Homeland Security Chief Privacy Officer Mary Ellen Callahan, left, and General Counsel Ivan Fong are sworn in on Capitol Hill prior to testifying about the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)at a House committee hearing. Acting on his promise to reinvigorate FOIA on his first day in office, Obama told all federal agencies to adopt a "presumption in favor of disclosure". According to an Associated Press analysis of federal data over the last three years from 37 of the largest federal departments and agencies, the Obama administration couldn't keep pace with the increasing number of people asking for copies of government documents, emails, photographs and more under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
FILE - In this March 31, 2011, file photo Homeland Security Chief Privacy Officer Mary Ellen Callahan, left, and General Counsel Ivan Fong are sworn in on Capitol Hill prior to testifying about the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA)at a House committee hearing. Acting on his promise to reinvigorate FOIA on his first day in office, Obama told all federal agencies to adopt a "presumption in favor of disclosure". According to an Associated Press analysis of federal data over the last three years from 37 of the largest federal departments and agencies, the Obama administration couldn't keep pace with the increasing number of people asking for copies of government documents, emails, photographs and more under the U.S. Freedom of Information Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
View Comments (0)