FILE - In this May 8, 2012 file photo shows the snow capped peaks of the Djura Djura mountains in the rugged Berber-speaking Kabylie region of Algeria , 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of the capital where the last remnants of al-Qaida's Algerian branch are holed up. Weary from years of kidnappings, the inhabitants of Algeria’s rugged Kayblie mountains are finally turning against the al-Qaida fighters in their midst and helping security forces hunt them down. And that turnaround is giving Algeria its best chance yet to drive the terror network from its last Algerian stronghold. While defeated in much of the rest of the country, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb remains active in the Kabylie, partly because the Berbers there, the region’s original inhabitants before the arrival of the Arabs, have long been deeply hostile to the central government and refused to provide information on militant whereabouts or activity. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this May 8, 2012 file photo shows the snow capped peaks of the Djura Djura mountains in the rugged Berber-speaking Kabylie region of Algeria , 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of the capital where the last remnants of al-Qaida's Algerian branch are holed up. Weary from years of kidnappings, the inhabitants of Algeria’s rugged Kayblie mountains are finally turning against the al-Qaida fighters in their midst and helping security forces hunt them down. And that turnaround is giving Algeria its best chance yet to drive the terror network from its last Algerian stronghold. While defeated in much of the rest of the country, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb remains active in the Kabylie, partly because the Berbers there, the region’s original inhabitants before the arrival of the Arabs, have long been deeply hostile to the central government and refused to provide information on militant whereabouts or activity.  (AP Photo/Paul Schemm, File)
FILE - In this May 8, 2012 file photo shows the snow capped peaks of the Djura Djura mountains in the rugged Berber-speaking Kabylie region of Algeria , 75 miles (120 kilometers) east of the capital where the last remnants of al-Qaida's Algerian branch are holed up. Weary from years of kidnappings, the inhabitants of Algeria’s rugged Kayblie mountains are finally turning against the al-Qaida fighters in their midst and helping security forces hunt them down. And that turnaround is giving Algeria its best chance yet to drive the terror network from its last Algerian stronghold. While defeated in much of the rest of the country, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb remains active in the Kabylie, partly because the Berbers there, the region’s original inhabitants before the arrival of the Arabs, have long been deeply hostile to the central government and refused to provide information on militant whereabouts or activity. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm, File)
View Comments (0)