FILE - In this Monday, June 11, 2007 file photo, U.S. Army Gen. Dan McNeill, then top commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, speaks during an interview in Kabul, Afghanistan. McNeill served in 2007-08. Nearly two dozen generals have commanded troops from the United States and the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, since the American invasion in late 2001. While some analysts say fresh eyes are important, others wonder if the revolving door command has hurt U.S. continuity with critical Afghan partners. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Monday, June 11, 2007 file photo, U.S. Army Gen. Dan McNeill, then top commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, speaks during an interview in Kabul, Afghanistan. McNeill served in 2007-08. Nearly two dozen generals have commanded troops from the United States and the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, since the American invasion in late 2001. While some analysts say fresh eyes are important, others wonder if the revolving door command has hurt U.S. continuity with critical Afghan partners. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq, File)
FILE - In this Monday, June 11, 2007 file photo, U.S. Army Gen. Dan McNeill, then top commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Afghanistan, speaks during an interview in Kabul, Afghanistan. McNeill served in 2007-08. Nearly two dozen generals have commanded troops from the United States and the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force, since the American invasion in late 2001. While some analysts say fresh eyes are important, others wonder if the revolving door command has hurt U.S. continuity with critical Afghan partners. (AP Photo/Musadeq Sadeq, File)
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