FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 28, 2011 file photo, Saad el-Katatni, left, and Mohamed Morsi, center, of the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party track voter turnout on the first day of ... more 
FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 28, 2011 file photo, Saad el-Katatni, left, and Mohamed Morsi, center, of the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party track voter turnout on the first day of parliamentary elections in Cairo, Egypt. There is a gaping hole in the center of Egypt’s presidential election next week: The Muslim Brotherhood. Formerly the country’s most powerful electoral machine, the Islamic group has been decimated by a fierce crackdown and its members are boycotting the vote, struggling to step up protests to get their voice heard. But the street protests have become little more than routine, while the May 26-27 vote could seal the group’s expulsion from political life if a strong turnout shows the extent of the public’s shift away from the group since the ouster of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi.(AP Photo/Mohammed Abu Zaid, File) less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Mohammed Abu Zaid, File
Wed, May 21, 2014 1:39 PM EDT