FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2012, file photo, John Fahey, the head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, ponders a question during a news conference in Paris, ending the symposium called "The Pharmaceutical Industry and the Fight against Doping: New Partnerships for Clean Sport." Admitting he cheated was a start. Now, it's all about whether Armstrong is ready to give details, lots of them, to clean up his sport. "He didn't name names," Fahey told The Associated Press in Australia. "He didn't say who supplied him, what officials were involved." (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2012, file photo, John Fahey, the head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, ponders a question during a news conference in Paris, ending the symposium called "The Pharmaceutical Industry and the Fight against Doping: New Partnerships for Clean Sport."  Admitting he cheated was a start. Now, it's all about whether Armstrong is ready to give details, lots of them, to clean up his sport. "He didn't name names,"  Fahey told The Associated Press in Australia. "He didn't say who supplied him, what officials were involved." (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2012, file photo, John Fahey, the head of the World Anti-Doping Agency, ponders a question during a news conference in Paris, ending the symposium called "The Pharmaceutical Industry and the Fight against Doping: New Partnerships for Clean Sport." Admitting he cheated was a start. Now, it's all about whether Armstrong is ready to give details, lots of them, to clean up his sport. "He didn't name names," Fahey told The Associated Press in Australia. "He didn't say who supplied him, what officials were involved." (AP Photo/Francois Mori, File)
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