FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2012 file photo, bartender Karolina Obrycka, who was beaten in February 2007 by off-duty Chicago police officer Anthony Abbate, listens while her attorney Terry Ekl speaks during a news conference in Chicago after jurors awarded her $850,000 in damages. The city of Chicago and Obrycka, whose videotaped beating by Abbate drew national attention, have taken the unusual step of asking a judge to toss a landmark civil verdict in the case. In deciding against the city last month, jurors determined some officers follow a code of silence protecting rogue colleagues like the officer involved. If the judge grants the motion, the city would forgo any appeal and pay Obrycka the full damages immediately. Otherwise, a payment could be delayed years. Striking the verdict would deny others suing the city the chance to cite it as precedent. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2012 file photo, bartender Karolina Obrycka, who was beaten in February 2007 by off-duty Chicago police officer Anthony Abbate, listens while her attorney Terry Ekl speaks during a news conference in Chicago after jurors awarded her $850,000 in damages. The city of Chicago and Obrycka, whose videotaped beating by Abbate drew national attention, have taken the unusual step of asking a judge to toss a landmark civil verdict in the case. In deciding against the city last month, jurors determined some officers follow a code of silence protecting rogue colleagues like the officer involved. If the judge grants the motion, the city would forgo any appeal and pay Obrycka the full damages immediately. Otherwise, a payment could be delayed years. Striking the verdict would deny others suing the city the chance to cite it as precedent. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2012 file photo, bartender Karolina Obrycka, who was beaten in February 2007 by off-duty Chicago police officer Anthony Abbate, listens while her attorney Terry Ekl speaks during a news conference in Chicago after jurors awarded her $850,000 in damages. The city of Chicago and Obrycka, whose videotaped beating by Abbate drew national attention, have taken the unusual step of asking a judge to toss a landmark civil verdict in the case. In deciding against the city last month, jurors determined some officers follow a code of silence protecting rogue colleagues like the officer involved. If the judge grants the motion, the city would forgo any appeal and pay Obrycka the full damages immediately. Otherwise, a payment could be delayed years. Striking the verdict would deny others suing the city the chance to cite it as precedent. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
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