FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2009 file photo, Lynne Stewart, the disbarred lawyer convicted in a terrorism case, speaks to supporters before entering federal court in Manhattan to surrender, in New York. A report by the Justice Department's inspector general critical of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons for how it uses its compassionate release program to free inmates with terminal illnesses is giving fresh hope to some of the country's oldest inmates, including Stewart. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2009 file photo, Lynne Stewart, the disbarred lawyer convicted in a terrorism case, speaks to supporters before entering federal court in Manhattan to surrender, in New York. A report by the Justice Department's inspector general critical of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons for how it uses its compassionate release program to free inmates with terminal illnesses is giving fresh hope to some of the country's oldest inmates, including Stewart. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2009 file photo, Lynne Stewart, the disbarred lawyer convicted in a terrorism case, speaks to supporters before entering federal court in Manhattan to surrender, in New York. A report by the Justice Department's inspector general critical of the U.S. Bureau of Prisons for how it uses its compassionate release program to free inmates with terminal illnesses is giving fresh hope to some of the country's oldest inmates, including Stewart. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
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