FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2012 file photo, members of a caravan of Central American mothers hold photographs of their disappeared children during a mass at the Basilica of Guadalupe in Mexico City. As people across Mexico prepare Day of the Dead offerings with flowers, food and candy skulls, thousands of families across the country can’t mourn or remember their loved ones in the old Mexican tradition, because their relatives disappeared in the wave of drug-fueled violence. The sign reads in Spanish "Wanted, Denis Mauricio Jimenes Bautista." (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, file)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2012 file photo, members of a caravan of Central American mothers hold photographs of their disappeared children during a mass at the Basilica of Guadalupe in Mexico City. As people across Mexico prepare Day of the Dead offerings with flowers, food and candy skulls, thousands of families across the country can’t mourn or remember their loved ones in the old Mexican tradition, because their relatives disappeared in the wave of drug-fueled violence. The sign reads in Spanish "Wanted, Denis Mauricio Jimenes Bautista."  (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, file)
FILE - In this Oct. 28, 2012 file photo, members of a caravan of Central American mothers hold photographs of their disappeared children during a mass at the Basilica of Guadalupe in Mexico City. As people across Mexico prepare Day of the Dead offerings with flowers, food and candy skulls, thousands of families across the country can’t mourn or remember their loved ones in the old Mexican tradition, because their relatives disappeared in the wave of drug-fueled violence. The sign reads in Spanish "Wanted, Denis Mauricio Jimenes Bautista." (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte, file)