Protesters grab the shield of a police officer on the ground during a protest against President Enrique Pena Nieto's education reform in Mexico City, in this September 11, 2013 file picture. A year ... more 
Protesters grab the shield of a police officer on the ground during a protest against President Enrique Pena Nieto's education reform in Mexico City, in this September 11, 2013 file picture. A year ago, President Enrique Pena Nieto took office vowing a root-and-branch reform of Mexico's economy even though he had no majority in Congress and faced accusations from the main opposition parties that he stole the election. He has since passed a major education overhaul, shaken up oversight of the telecommunications market, pushed through reforms of the tax system and banking rules and put an end to Mexico's 75-year-old oil and gas monopoly. It is a remarkable list of victories after years of gridlock in Congress, where no party has held a majority since 1997. But it will count for little unless Pena Nieto can convert the legislation into hard and fast benefits for Mexicans, who want a strong economy and more well-paid jobs. Picture taken September 11, 2013 To match Analysis MEXICO-REFORMS/ REUTERS/Oswaldo Ramirez (MEXICO - Tags: POLITICS EDUCATION CIVIL UNREST) less 
1 / 30
Reuters | Photo By STRINGER/MEXICO / REUTERS
Tue, Dec 17, 2013 1:49 PM EST