FILE - In this Saturday, July 21, 2012 file photo, sailors march in uniform during the gay pride parade in San Diego. For the first time ever, U.S. service members had marched in a gay pride event decked out in uniform Saturday, after a recent memorandum from the Defense Department to all military branches made an allowance for the San Diego parade - even though its policy generally bars troops from marching in uniform in parades. On Sept. 20, 2011, the repeal of the policy known as "don't ask, don't tell" took effect, enabling gay and lesbian members of the military to serve openly, no longer forced to lie and keep their personal lives under wraps. One year later, the Pentagon says repeal has gone smoothly, with no adverse effect on morale, recruitment or readiness. Some critics persist with complaints that repeal has infringed on service members whose religious faiths condemn homosexuality. Instances of anti-gay harassment have not ended. And activists are frustrated that gay and lesbian military families don't yet enjoy the benefits and services extended to other military families. Yet the clear consensus is that repeal has produced far more joy and relief than dismay and indignation. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Saturday, July 21, 2012 file photo, sailors march in uniform during the gay pride parade in San Diego. For the first time ever, U.S. service members had marched in a gay pride event decked out in uniform Saturday, after a recent memorandum from the Defense Department to all military branches made an allowance for the San Diego parade - even though its policy generally bars troops from marching in uniform in parades. On Sept. 20, 2011, the repeal of the policy known as "don't ask, don't tell" took effect, enabling gay and lesbian members of the military to serve openly, no longer forced to lie and keep their personal lives under wraps. One year later, the Pentagon says repeal has gone smoothly, with no adverse effect on morale, recruitment or readiness. Some critics persist with complaints that repeal has infringed on service members whose religious faiths condemn homosexuality. Instances of anti-gay harassment have not ended. And activists are frustrated that gay and lesbian military families don't yet enjoy the benefits and services extended to other military families. Yet the clear consensus is that repeal has produced far more joy and relief than dismay and indignation. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
FILE - In this Saturday, July 21, 2012 file photo, sailors march in uniform during the gay pride parade in San Diego. For the first time ever, U.S. service members had marched in a gay pride event decked out in uniform Saturday, after a recent memorandum from the Defense Department to all military branches made an allowance for the San Diego parade - even though its policy generally bars troops from marching in uniform in parades. On Sept. 20, 2011, the repeal of the policy known as "don't ask, don't tell" took effect, enabling gay and lesbian members of the military to serve openly, no longer forced to lie and keep their personal lives under wraps. One year later, the Pentagon says repeal has gone smoothly, with no adverse effect on morale, recruitment or readiness. Some critics persist with complaints that repeal has infringed on service members whose religious faiths condemn homosexuality. Instances of anti-gay harassment have not ended. And activists are frustrated that gay and lesbian military families don't yet enjoy the benefits and services extended to other military families. Yet the clear consensus is that repeal has produced far more joy and relief than dismay and indignation. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
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