FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2006 file photo, Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall, center, speaks during a news conference in Nashville, Tenn. At left is Gov. Phil Bredesen and at right is Nashville Mayor Bill Purcell. Hall, also president of the American Correctional Association, oversees a 4,000-bed jail system that only has 20 beds set aside for juveniles. Once in isolation in the Nashville system, the offender gets more attention from the staff, not less, Hall said. "It better be important enough to separate someone, because you're going to spend more time and money on them," said Hall. "We need to be sure they're not harming themselves." In a report released Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, two of the nation's leading advocates for prisoners' rights said state governments should abolish the use of solitary confinement for offenders under 18, whether as a punitive or protective measure. For now, however, many state and local corrections agencies do house some juveniles in adult facilities, and options for dealing with problems may be limited by lack of space and resources. (AP Photo/ Mark Humphrey)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2006 file photo, Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall, center, speaks during a news conference in Nashville, Tenn. At left is Gov. Phil Bredesen and at right is Nashville Mayor Bill Purcell. Hall, also president of the American Correctional Association, oversees a 4,000-bed jail system that only has 20 beds set aside for juveniles. Once in isolation in the Nashville system, the offender gets more attention from the staff, not less, Hall said. "It better be important enough to separate someone, because you're going to spend more time and money on them," said Hall. "We need to be sure they're not harming themselves." In a report released Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, two of the nation's leading advocates for prisoners' rights said state governments should abolish the use of solitary confinement for offenders under 18, whether as a punitive or protective measure. For now, however, many state and local corrections agencies do house some juveniles in adult facilities, and options for dealing with problems may be limited by lack of space and resources. (AP Photo/ Mark Humphrey)
FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2006 file photo, Davidson County Sheriff Daron Hall, center, speaks during a news conference in Nashville, Tenn. At left is Gov. Phil Bredesen and at right is Nashville Mayor Bill Purcell. Hall, also president of the American Correctional Association, oversees a 4,000-bed jail system that only has 20 beds set aside for juveniles. Once in isolation in the Nashville system, the offender gets more attention from the staff, not less, Hall said. "It better be important enough to separate someone, because you're going to spend more time and money on them," said Hall. "We need to be sure they're not harming themselves." In a report released Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2012, two of the nation's leading advocates for prisoners' rights said state governments should abolish the use of solitary confinement for offenders under 18, whether as a punitive or protective measure. For now, however, many state and local corrections agencies do house some juveniles in adult facilities, and options for dealing with problems may be limited by lack of space and resources. (AP Photo/ Mark Humphrey)
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