FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2011 file photo, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The nearly bankrupt U.S. Postal Service, on the brink of default on a second multibillion-dollar payment it cannot afford to pay, is sounding a new cautionary note: having squeezed out as much cost savings within its power, the mail agency's viability now lies almost entirely with Congress. In an interview, Donahoe said the mail agency will be forced to miss the $5.6 billion payment due Sunday to the Treasury, its second default in as many months. Congress has left Washington until after the November elections, without approving a postal fix. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2011 file photo, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The nearly bankrupt U.S. Postal Service, on the brink of default on a second multibillion-dollar payment it cannot afford to pay, is sounding a new cautionary note: having squeezed out as much cost savings within its power, the mail agency's viability now lies almost entirely with Congress. In an interview, Donahoe said the mail agency will be forced to miss the $5.6 billion payment due Sunday to the Treasury, its second default in as many months. Congress has left Washington until after the November elections, without approving a postal fix.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2011 file photo, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The nearly bankrupt U.S. Postal Service, on the brink of default on a second multibillion-dollar payment it cannot afford to pay, is sounding a new cautionary note: having squeezed out as much cost savings within its power, the mail agency's viability now lies almost entirely with Congress. In an interview, Donahoe said the mail agency will be forced to miss the $5.6 billion payment due Sunday to the Treasury, its second default in as many months. Congress has left Washington until after the November elections, without approving a postal fix. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
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