FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2012, file photo Wisconsin Democratic Senate candidate, Rep. Tammy Baldwin waves at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. Of the four openly gay members of Congress, the two longest-serving stalwarts are vacating their seats. Instead of fretting, their activist admirers are excited about a record crop of gays vying to win seats in the next Congress _ and to make history in the process. A common denominator in all the races: neither the gay candidates nor their rivals are stressing sexual orientation, and the oft-heard refrain is, "It's not an issue." If anti-gay innuendo does surface from lower echelons of a campaign, there are swift disavowals _ even conservative candidates these days think twice about being depicted as biased against gays and lesbians. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2012, file photo Wisconsin Democratic Senate candidate, Rep. Tammy Baldwin waves at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. Of the four openly gay members of Congress, the two longest-serving stalwarts are vacating their seats. Instead of fretting, their activist admirers are excited about a record crop of gays vying to win seats in the next Congress _ and to make history in the process. A common denominator in all the races: neither the gay candidates nor their rivals are stressing sexual orientation, and the oft-heard refrain is, "It's not an issue." If anti-gay innuendo does surface from lower echelons of a campaign, there are swift disavowals _ even conservative candidates these days think twice about being depicted as biased against gays and lesbians.  (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
FILE - In this Sept. 6, 2012, file photo Wisconsin Democratic Senate candidate, Rep. Tammy Baldwin waves at the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C. Of the four openly gay members of Congress, the two longest-serving stalwarts are vacating their seats. Instead of fretting, their activist admirers are excited about a record crop of gays vying to win seats in the next Congress _ and to make history in the process. A common denominator in all the races: neither the gay candidates nor their rivals are stressing sexual orientation, and the oft-heard refrain is, "It's not an issue." If anti-gay innuendo does surface from lower echelons of a campaign, there are swift disavowals _ even conservative candidates these days think twice about being depicted as biased against gays and lesbians. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)
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