FILE - This Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011 file photo shows a flooded road on Hatteras Island, N.C., after Hurricane Irene swept through the area the previous day cutting the roadway in five locations. From ... more 
FILE - This Sunday, Aug. 28, 2011 file photo shows a flooded road on Hatteras Island, N.C., after Hurricane Irene swept through the area the previous day cutting the roadway in five locations. From Cape Hatteras, N.C., to just north of Boston, sea levels are rising much faster than they are around the globe, putting one of the world's most costly coasts in danger of flooding, according to a new study published Sunday, June 24, 2012, in the journal Nature Climate Change. By the year 2100, scientists and computer models estimate that sea levels globally could rise as much as 3.3 feet. The accelerated rate along the East Coast could add about another 8 to 11 inches, Asbury Sallenger Jr., an oceanographer for the USGS said. "Where that kind of thing becomes important is during a storm," Sallenger said. That's when it can damage buildings and erode coastlines. (AP Photo/Jim R. Bounds) less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Jim R. Bounds
Sun, Jun 24, 2012 2:22 PM EDT