FILE - Supporters of Proposition B, which would roll back public pensions, adjust a sign before a rally on election day in San Diego in this Tuesday, June 5, 2012 file photo. For years, companies have been chipping away at workers' pensions. Now, two California cities may help pave the way for governments to follow suit. Voters in San Diego and San Jose, the nation's eighth- and 10th-largest cities, overwhelmingly approved ballot measures last week to roll back municipal retirement benefits — and not just for future hires but for current employees. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)

Associated Press
FILE - Supporters of Proposition B, which would roll back public pensions, adjust a sign before a rally on election day in San Diego in this Tuesday, June 5, 2012 file photo. For years, companies have been chipping away at workers' pensions. Now, two California cities may help pave the way for governments to follow suit. Voters in San Diego and San Jose, the nation's eighth- and 10th-largest cities, overwhelmingly approved ballot measures last week to roll back municipal retirement benefits — and not just for future hires but for current employees. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
FILE - Supporters of Proposition B, which would roll back public pensions, adjust a sign before a rally on election day in San Diego in this Tuesday, June 5, 2012 file photo. For years, companies have been chipping away at workers' pensions. Now, two California cities may help pave the way for governments to follow suit. Voters in San Diego and San Jose, the nation's eighth- and 10th-largest cities, overwhelmingly approved ballot measures last week to roll back municipal retirement benefits — and not just for future hires but for current employees. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
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