FILE - TO GO WITH TEXAS ECOSISTEMAS - In this Aug. 2, 2011 file photo, Jeff Bonner, Wildlife Biologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, looks over the banks of the almost completely dried up ... more 
FILE - TO GO WITH TEXAS ECOSISTEMAS - In this Aug. 2, 2011 file photo, Jeff Bonner, Wildlife Biologist with Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, looks over the banks of the almost completely dried up Canadian River, in Hemphill County in Amarillo, Texas. A devastating drought sweeping across Texas is turning rivers into sand, creeks into mud, springs into mere trickles and lakes into large puddles, destroying habitats and ecosystems crucial to the survival of hundreds of wildlife and plant species. Now, with the second-worst drought in Lone Star State history expected to stick around for at least a year, biologists say the impacts on those habitats will be so severe and widespread they will last for years after the drought ends. (AP Photo/Michael Norris, file) less 
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Associated Press | Photo By Michael Norris, file
Tue, Aug 9, 2011 1:15 PM EDT