FILE - In this Thursday, March 22, 2012 file photo, a commuter walks past the abandoned, unfinished headquarters of Anglo Irish Bank in Dublin. The Irish government is ending its guarantee to insure bank bondholders against losses, a move that reflects growing confidence that the country's three main banks can survive on their own. Ireland's emergency 2008 decision to insure bank bondholders against potential losses failed to shore up confidence in its banks — and ended up bankrupting the nation. But Ireland this year is taking steps to repair its credit rating and exit its own 2010 international bailout. The decision made Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013 by the government, to end the insurance scheme for foreign investors in Ireland's banks on March 28 offers more evidence that the country is getting ready to resume normal debt financing. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik, File)

Associated Press
FILE - In this Thursday, March 22, 2012 file photo, a commuter walks past the abandoned, unfinished headquarters of Anglo Irish Bank in Dublin. The Irish government is ending its guarantee to insure bank bondholders against losses, a move that reflects growing confidence that the country's three main banks can survive on their own. Ireland's emergency 2008 decision to insure bank bondholders against potential losses failed to shore up confidence in its banks — and ended up bankrupting the nation. But Ireland this year is taking steps to repair its credit rating and exit its own 2010 international bailout.  The decision made Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013 by the government,  to end the insurance scheme for foreign investors in Ireland's banks on March 28 offers more evidence that the country is getting ready to resume normal debt financing. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, March 22, 2012 file photo, a commuter walks past the abandoned, unfinished headquarters of Anglo Irish Bank in Dublin. The Irish government is ending its guarantee to insure bank bondholders against losses, a move that reflects growing confidence that the country's three main banks can survive on their own. Ireland's emergency 2008 decision to insure bank bondholders against potential losses failed to shore up confidence in its banks — and ended up bankrupting the nation. But Ireland this year is taking steps to repair its credit rating and exit its own 2010 international bailout. The decision made Tuesday, Feb. 26, 2013 by the government, to end the insurance scheme for foreign investors in Ireland's banks on March 28 offers more evidence that the country is getting ready to resume normal debt financing. (AP Photo/Shawn Pogatchnik, File)
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