FILE-In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, file photo, a worker sits atop a steel beam at the Love Field modernization project construction site in Dallas. Anyone puzzled by the most recent U.S. economic data has reason for feeling so as the numbers sketch a sometimes contradictory picture of the economy. People are more confident but aren’t spending much. Fewer people are losing jobs, but not many are being hired. Home and stock prices are up, but workers’ pay is trailing inflation. This is what an economy stuck in a slow-growth rut can look like. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

Associated Press
FILE-In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, file photo, a worker sits atop a steel beam at the Love Field modernization project construction site in Dallas. Anyone puzzled by the most recent U.S. economic data has reason for feeling so as the numbers sketch a sometimes contradictory picture of the economy. People are more confident but aren’t spending much. Fewer people are losing jobs, but not many are being hired. Home and stock prices are up, but workers’ pay is trailing inflation. This is what an economy stuck in a slow-growth rut can look like. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
FILE-In this Thursday, Sept. 1, 2011, file photo, a worker sits atop a steel beam at the Love Field modernization project construction site in Dallas. Anyone puzzled by the most recent U.S. economic data has reason for feeling so as the numbers sketch a sometimes contradictory picture of the economy. People are more confident but aren’t spending much. Fewer people are losing jobs, but not many are being hired. Home and stock prices are up, but workers’ pay is trailing inflation. This is what an economy stuck in a slow-growth rut can look like. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
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