Filipino nannies stroll with children during their duty hours at a park in Tokyo November 29, 2013. During the early days of "Abenomics," U.S. businesses were optimistic they could convince Japan's ... more 
Filipino nannies stroll with children during their duty hours at a park in Tokyo November 29, 2013. During the early days of "Abenomics," U.S. businesses were optimistic they could convince Japan's government to make a small change to the nation's tight immigration rules to let more household helpers into the country. But a year after Prime Minister Shinzo Abe took office, an idea that some thought might be an easy win for immigration reform while meeting a stated aim of Abe's growth strategy has made no apparent progress. The tangle of issues involved in employing foreign workers as housekeepers or nannies helps to illustrate the labyrinthine task Japan would face if it were to try to tackle much broader immigration reform. There are no clear statistics on the number of foreign household helpers in Japan as many are working informally and those working legally, do so under a broad visa category. But foreign workers themselves say their numbers are shrinking. Picture taken November 29, 2013. To match story JAPAN-ECONOMY/IMMIGRATION REUTERS/Issei Kato (JAPAN - Tags: POLITICS SOCIETY IMMIGRATION BUSINESS EMPLOYMENT) less 
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Reuters | Photo By ISSEI KATO / REUTERS
Tue, Dec 10, 2013 4:02 PM EST