Freddy Lopez, who works selling coffee from his cart in the street, serves a 5 peso cup of coffee with milk in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. According to the government, it only takes six pesos a day to eat in Argentina. But on the streets of the capital, 6 pesos doesn't stretch beyond a pack of chewing gum, or a cup of yogurt, or a single "alfajor": the country's traditional caramel-and-chocolate cookies. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Associated Press
Freddy Lopez, who works selling coffee from his cart in the street, serves a 5 peso cup of coffee with milk in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. According to the government, it only takes six pesos a day to eat in Argentina. But on the streets of the capital, 6 pesos doesn't stretch beyond a pack of chewing gum, or a cup of yogurt, or a single "alfajor": the country's traditional caramel-and-chocolate cookies. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
Freddy Lopez, who works selling coffee from his cart in the street, serves a 5 peso cup of coffee with milk in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013. According to the government, it only takes six pesos a day to eat in Argentina. But on the streets of the capital, 6 pesos doesn't stretch beyond a pack of chewing gum, or a cup of yogurt, or a single "alfajor": the country's traditional caramel-and-chocolate cookies. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)
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