In this Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 photo, Syrian filmmaker Joud Said, center, works on a film set in Damascus, Syria. Syria's civil war has driven wedges through many parts of society, with violence that has killed more than 40,000 people exacerbating differences in class, ideology and religion. Reflecting how deep these divisions run is the near complete split of Syria's artists into pro- and anti-regime camps. Although Syria's writers, musicians and filmmakers fight with sharply worded statements instead of guns and tanks, their mutual animosity bodes ill for reconciliation should Bashar Assad fall. (AP Photo/Nora Fahham)

Associated Press
In this Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 photo, Syrian filmmaker Joud Said, center, works on a film set in Damascus, Syria. Syria's civil war has driven wedges through many parts of society, with violence that has killed more than 40,000 people exacerbating differences in class, ideology and religion. Reflecting how deep these divisions run is the near complete split of Syria's artists into pro- and anti-regime camps. Although Syria's writers, musicians and filmmakers fight with sharply worded statements instead of guns and tanks, their mutual animosity bodes ill for reconciliation should Bashar Assad fall.  (AP Photo/Nora Fahham)
In this Friday, Nov. 4, 2011 photo, Syrian filmmaker Joud Said, center, works on a film set in Damascus, Syria. Syria's civil war has driven wedges through many parts of society, with violence that has killed more than 40,000 people exacerbating differences in class, ideology and religion. Reflecting how deep these divisions run is the near complete split of Syria's artists into pro- and anti-regime camps. Although Syria's writers, musicians and filmmakers fight with sharply worded statements instead of guns and tanks, their mutual animosity bodes ill for reconciliation should Bashar Assad fall. (AP Photo/Nora Fahham)
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