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In this Friday, Nov. 9, 2012 photo, Kedao Wang, 21, of Shanghai, China, a senior at the University of Michigan walks on campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. Wang, one of about 6,400 overseas students at the University of Michigan, said his experience has been excellent but agrees growing numbers don’t solve the isolation problem. Virtually all Chinese students struggle at least somewhat to fit in, due to language and cultural barriers. New figures out Monday, Nov. 12, 2012 show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase from China, even as total enrollment was leveling out. But perhaps more revealing is where much of the growth is concentrated: big, public land-grant colleges, notably in the Midwest. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Associated Press
In this Friday, Nov. 9, 2012 photo, Kedao Wang, 21, of Shanghai, China, a senior at the University of Michigan walks on campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. Wang, one of about 6,400 overseas students at the University of Michigan, said his experience has been excellent but agrees growing numbers don’t solve the isolation problem. Virtually all Chinese students struggle at least somewhat to fit in, due to language and cultural barriers. New figures out Monday, Nov. 12, 2012 show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase from China, even as total enrollment was leveling out. But perhaps more revealing is where much of the growth is concentrated: big, public land-grant colleges, notably in the Midwest. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
In this Friday, Nov. 9, 2012 photo, Kedao Wang, 21, of Shanghai, China, a senior at the University of Michigan walks on campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. Wang, one of about 6,400 overseas students at the University of Michigan, said his experience has been excellent but agrees growing numbers don’t solve the isolation problem. Virtually all Chinese students struggle at least somewhat to fit in, due to language and cultural barriers. New figures out Monday, Nov. 12, 2012 show international enrollment at U.S. colleges and universities grew nearly 6 percent last year, driven by a 23-percent increase from China, even as total enrollment was leveling out. But perhaps more revealing is where much of the growth is concentrated: big, public land-grant colleges, notably in the Midwest. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
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