This Friday, Oct. 5, 2012 photo shows mid relief on a Roman tombstone , found on the site of Ratiaria, an ancient Roman settlement located on the banks of the Danube, in the northwest corner of Bulgaria. Located on the crossroads of many ancient civilizations, Bulgarian scholars rank their country behind only Italy and Greece in Europe for the numbers of antiquities lying in its soil. But Bulgaria has been powerless to prevent the rape of its ancient sites, depriving the world of part of its cultural legacy and also costing this impoverished Balkan nation much-needed tourism revenue. (AP Photo/Valentina Petrova)

Associated Press
This Friday, Oct. 5, 2012 photo shows mid relief on a Roman tombstone , found on the site of Ratiaria, an ancient Roman settlement located on the banks of the Danube, in the northwest corner of Bulgaria.  Located on the crossroads of many ancient civilizations, Bulgarian scholars rank their country behind only Italy and Greece in Europe for the numbers of antiquities lying in its soil. But Bulgaria has been powerless to prevent the rape of its ancient sites, depriving the world of part of its cultural legacy and also costing this impoverished Balkan nation much-needed tourism revenue.  (AP Photo/Valentina Petrova)
This Friday, Oct. 5, 2012 photo shows mid relief on a Roman tombstone , found on the site of Ratiaria, an ancient Roman settlement located on the banks of the Danube, in the northwest corner of Bulgaria. Located on the crossroads of many ancient civilizations, Bulgarian scholars rank their country behind only Italy and Greece in Europe for the numbers of antiquities lying in its soil. But Bulgaria has been powerless to prevent the rape of its ancient sites, depriving the world of part of its cultural legacy and also costing this impoverished Balkan nation much-needed tourism revenue. (AP Photo/Valentina Petrova)
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