German interior minister Hans-Peter Friedrich , right, looks at his watch next to Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania interior minister Lorenz Caffier , left, as they arrive at a meeting with interior ministers of the 16 German states in Warnemuende, eastern Germany Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012. German security officials are moving toward a new attempt to ban the country's only significant far-right party, after meticulously collecting new evidence in an effort to avoid a repeat of the debacle when they tried to ban it in 2003. The interior ministers of Germany's 16 states are expected to recommend Wednesday evening pursuing a new ban of the National Democratic Party on allegations it promotes a racist, xenophobic, and anti-Semitic agenda in violation of the country's constitution. Under the previous government of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, the country's Federal Constitutional Court rejected an attempt to ban the party after it turned out paid government informants within the NPD, as it known by its German initials, were partially responsible for the evidence against the party. (AP Photo/dapd/ Thomas Haentzschel)

Associated Press
German interior minister Hans-Peter Friedrich , right, looks at his watch next to Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania interior minister Lorenz Caffier , left, as they arrive at a meeting with interior ministers of the 16 German states in Warnemuende, eastern Germany Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012.  German security officials are moving toward a new attempt to ban the country's only significant far-right party, after meticulously collecting new evidence in an effort to avoid a repeat of the debacle when they tried to ban it in 2003.   The interior ministers of Germany's 16 states are expected to recommend Wednesday  evening pursuing a new ban of the National Democratic Party on allegations it promotes a racist, xenophobic, and anti-Semitic agenda in violation of the country's constitution.  Under the previous government of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, the country's Federal Constitutional Court rejected an attempt to ban the party after it turned out paid government informants within the NPD, as it known by its German initials, were partially responsible for the evidence against the party. (AP Photo/dapd/ Thomas Haentzschel)
German interior minister Hans-Peter Friedrich , right, looks at his watch next to Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania interior minister Lorenz Caffier , left, as they arrive at a meeting with interior ministers of the 16 German states in Warnemuende, eastern Germany Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012. German security officials are moving toward a new attempt to ban the country's only significant far-right party, after meticulously collecting new evidence in an effort to avoid a repeat of the debacle when they tried to ban it in 2003. The interior ministers of Germany's 16 states are expected to recommend Wednesday evening pursuing a new ban of the National Democratic Party on allegations it promotes a racist, xenophobic, and anti-Semitic agenda in violation of the country's constitution. Under the previous government of Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, the country's Federal Constitutional Court rejected an attempt to ban the party after it turned out paid government informants within the NPD, as it known by its German initials, were partially responsible for the evidence against the party. (AP Photo/dapd/ Thomas Haentzschel)
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