A helium dewar holding 250 liters of helium at -269 degrees Celsius (4.2 Kelvin (4.2 degrees above absolute zero or -452.2 degrees Fahrenheit) is shown at a Quantum Physics laboratory at the ... more 
A helium dewar holding 250 liters of helium at -269 degrees Celsius (4.2 Kelvin (4.2 degrees above absolute zero or -452.2 degrees Fahrenheit) is shown at a Quantum Physics laboratory at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois, in this handout photo provided by the University of Chicago and taken on September 18, 2013. Helium, known for making the voice squeaky after it is inhaled from party balloons, but it is also a vital element in industries from aerospace and defence, to smart phones and flat-screen TVs, medical equipment and deep-sea diving tanks. The U.S. Federal Helium Reserve has been providing around a third of global crude helium and 40 percent of U.S. supply. But this will be turned off after October 7 unless Congress acts to extend its life. Picture taken September 18, 2013. To match Analysis HELIUM-SHORTAGE/ REUTERS/Courtesy Dr. Woowon Kang/University of Chicago/Handout via Reuters (UNITED STATES - Tags: EDUCATION ENERGY) ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. NO SALES. NO ARCHIVES. THIS PICTURE IS DISTRIBUTED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS less 
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Reuters | Photo By HANDOUT / REUTERS
Thu, Sep 19, 2013 5:50 AM EDT