This handout photo provided by the Texas Department of Public Safety shows Michael Blair. When Blair was sent to death row for the infamous murder of 7-year-old Ashley Estell, he insisted he never killed anyone. More than a decade later, genetic testing showed he was telling the truth. But during those long years behind bars, Blair confessed to raping two other children, a crime for which he's serving multiple life sentences. Blair has made an unlikely demand, asking the state for nearly $1 million as compensation for being wrongfully convicted. His request has gone all the way to the Texas Supreme Court and is forcing a re-examination of laws designed to offer exonerated inmates a new start. (AP Photo/ Texas Department of Public Safety)

Associated Press
This handout photo provided by the Texas Department of Public Safety shows Michael Blair. When Blair was sent to death row for the infamous murder of 7-year-old Ashley Estell, he insisted he never killed anyone. More than a decade later, genetic testing showed he was telling the truth. But during those long years behind bars, Blair confessed to raping two other children, a crime for which he's serving multiple life sentences. Blair has made an unlikely demand, asking the state for nearly $1 million as compensation for being wrongfully convicted. His request has gone all the way to the Texas Supreme Court and is forcing a re-examination of laws designed to offer exonerated inmates a new start.  (AP Photo/ Texas Department of Public Safety)
This handout photo provided by the Texas Department of Public Safety shows Michael Blair. When Blair was sent to death row for the infamous murder of 7-year-old Ashley Estell, he insisted he never killed anyone. More than a decade later, genetic testing showed he was telling the truth. But during those long years behind bars, Blair confessed to raping two other children, a crime for which he's serving multiple life sentences. Blair has made an unlikely demand, asking the state for nearly $1 million as compensation for being wrongfully convicted. His request has gone all the way to the Texas Supreme Court and is forcing a re-examination of laws designed to offer exonerated inmates a new start. (AP Photo/ Texas Department of Public Safety)
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